Lens culinaris

Overview
GenusLens
Speciesculinaris
Common NameCultivated Lentil
AbbreviationL.culinaris

Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an important pulse crop with annual production of 3-4 Mt across 70 countries (Cubero et al. 2009. DOI 10.1079/9781845934873.0000; pg. 13). Lentils are a good source of protein, carbohydrates, micronutrients and vitamins for human nutrition and is consumed in more than 120 countries. Furthermore, their small seed size and flat shape make them relatively quick cooking and easily decorticated compared to most other grain legumes (Sharpe et al. 2013. BMC Genomics. DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-14-192). The Lentil plant has a bushy growth habit with a height of about 40 cm; the seeds are lens-shaped and usually grow two per pod.

Breeding at the University of Saskatchewan

Market Classes: Large Green, Medium Green, Small Green, Small Red, Extra Small Red, as well as, a Few Minor Specialty Classes.

Breeding Objectives: High Yield, Lodging Tolerance, Appropriate Size, Shape, Seed Coat Colour & Quality, and Resistance to Ascochyta Blight, Anthracnose, Stemphylium Blight & Botrytis .

Germplasm Data
The following germplasm data is currently available:
Stock TypeCount
Single Cross2,321
Single Cross2,321
Triple Cross1,498
Triple Cross1,498
Individual1,025
Individual1,025
DNA472
DNA472
Multiple Cross365
Multiple Cross365
variety358
variety358
Backcross243
Backcross243
Double Cross126
Double Cross126
Population58
Population58
Sequence & Variant Data
The following sequence and variant data are currently present:
Feature TypeCount
marker56,562
marker56,562
SNP52,183
SNP52,183
contig28,939
contig28,939
EST9,513
EST9,513
MNP1,543
MNP1,543
read_pair1,206
read_pair1,206
indel789
indel789
Nutritional Facts

Lentils, raw (dry weight)

Energy
343.00
kcal
Carbohydrate, by difference
60.08
g
Fiber, total dietary
30.50
g
Sugars, total
2.03
g
Projects
2009
Ninety-six USDA lines were run on the Lc1536 Lentil Illumina Golden Gate assay.
2009
A set of 1107 legume cross species orthologous sequences (COS) were amplified from Lens culinaris (CDC Redberry and Eston) and L. ervoides (L01-827a and IG 72815). Sequences were aligned and SNPs identified. A subset of 110 KASP assays were designed for use in L. culinaris. An Illumina GoldenGate array of 768 SNPs was designed for use in L. ervoides or interspecies hybrid populations between Lc and Le.
2008 to 2009
Mixture of eight cultivars with varying seed phenotypes: Indian Head, Commando, CDC LeMay, CDC Robin, and breeding lines 1899T-50 and 1788-4 (CDC, Univ. Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada) All developmental stages of seeds and very young fertilized pods were harvested from mature plants, and divided into the following lots: very young fertilized ovaries, young ovules, enlarging seeds, cotyledons of fully filled seed, seed coats of fully filled seeds. cDNA library was made from a mixture of equal amounts of mRNA extracted from each of the above tissues.
2009
In many important crop species, the strategy of single seed descent (SSD) enables only 2 - 3 generations per year. Approximately eight generations of inbreeding are required before plants are mostly homozygous (‘true breeding’). This creates a ‘bottleneck’ in cultivar development. Hence, the purpose of this project is to develop a rapid generation cycling technique for CDC pulse crops in order to speed up the breeding process by using in vitro flowering technique.
2009
Lentil has been grown commercially in western Canada since 1970. Ascochyta lentis, the causal agent of ascochyta blight of lentil is established as one of the most economically important diseases of lentil in Western Canada. To deal with this problem, the widely acceptable genetic improvement strategy is to pyramid resistance genes. Developing closely linked single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for resistance genes is prerequisite for pyramiding resistance genes. To develop SNP markers, a series of selected recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations derived from resistant sources will be phenotyped under greenhouse conditions (pathogenicity tests) followed by screening available SNP markers across the entire set of RIL populations.
2009
Stemphylium blight caused by the fungal pathogen Stemphylium botryosum is a lentil disease that has become more prominent in Saskatchewan in recent years. The disease is not well studied under our growing conditions, and information is sketchy on optimal conditions for serious outbreaks of stemphylium blight, yield loss and appropriate disease management strategies. The objectives of this 5-year project are to develop a protocol for the mass production of spores (conidia) of Stemphylium botryosum for the purpose of controlled inoculations; to conduct replicated field experiments to determine yield loss through stemphylium blight, using the tunnel system evaluated in the pilot study and the spore inoculum developed under (1); and to evaluate and optimize the use of tunnels and spore inoculation for resistance screening of lentil germplasm to stemphylium blight.

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