Lens orientalis

Overview
GenusLens
Speciesorientalis
Common NameL. orientalis
AbbreviationL. orientalis

Lens orientalis is a wild relative of Lens culinaris with lanceolate stipules. The geographical distribution of Lens orientalis ranges from Turkey to Uzbekistan with a primary habitat of stony and gravelly niches where aggressive annuals are not successful1. Lens orientalis usually forms small disjunct populations containing a small number of plants in sparse stands1. More extensive populations of L. orientalis were found at high elevations (800 to 2,000 m)1. Recent sequence analysis indicates that Lens orientalis is in the primary gene pool of L. culinaris2

Citation:
1. G. Ladizinsky, D. Braun, D. Goshen and F. J. Muehlbauer. (1984) The Biological Species of the Genus Lens L. Botanical Gazette 145(2): 253-261.
2. Wong MML, Gujaria-Verma N, Ramsay L, Yuan HY, Caron C, Diapari M, et al. (2015) Classification and Characterization of Species within the Genus Lens Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS). PLoS ONE 10(3): e0122025. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0122025.

Germplasm Data
The following germplasm data is currently available:
Stock TypeCount
Individual260
Individual260
DNA2
DNA2
Population1
Population1
Projects
2015 to 2019
Development of improved lentil cultivars well-adapted to the local environment is an on-going process in the breeding program and is critical for long-term genetic gain. Recent climate instability adds another layer of complexity to breeding efforts. Continued genetic improvement of lentil will, therefore, involve the introduction of new alleles that extend beyond the existing adapted pool of germplasm. Our goal in AGILE is to enhance the productivity and quality of Canadian lentils by expediting the expansion of genetic diversity of the Canadian lentil germplasm base with the use of genomic technologies.
2017
This project is being conducted in the agriculture greenhouses with the 7 Lens species and the commercial strain of R. leguminosarum BASF 4035.
2014 to 2017
This is an international project funded by the Global Crop Diversity Trust aimed at evaluating cultivated x wild lentil introgression lines for multiple traits in multiple environments.
2016
Lentil recombinant inbred lines (LR-86) derived from a cross between Lupa # 7 (L. culinaris) x BGE016880 (L. orientalis) were evaluated in five replications in 2016 in the field at the Crop Science Field Lab of the University of Saskatchewan. Days to flowering, days to maturity, plant height at maturity, shattering percentage, number of seeds per plant, and seed yield per plant were recorded. The population was genotyped and mapped using a genotyping-by-sequencing approach. Major QTLs for shattering resistance were identified on LGs 4 and 7. In 2017, the population was grown in two locations (Investigation field and Sutherland) in three replications to confirm the identified QTL for shattering resistance.
2012
Lentil seed is a good source of phenolic compounds, which can have health benefits. This project will try to find how different seed coat colours in lentil can be related to the phenolics profile. A fast extraction method and an optimized LC-MS analysis were applied to compare green, gray, tan, and brown seed coat colour lentils. Also, the so called zero-tannin genotypes were compared with the normal ones based upon their phenolic profile. The effect of storage on phenolic profile of lentil seeds was investigated, as well.
2009
Lentil has been grown commercially in western Canada since 1970. Ascochyta lentis, the causal agent of ascochyta blight of lentil is established as one of the most economically important diseases of lentil in Western Canada. To deal with this problem, the widely acceptable genetic improvement strategy is to pyramid resistance genes. Developing closely linked single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for resistance genes is prerequisite for pyramiding resistance genes. To develop SNP markers, a series of selected recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations derived from resistant sources will be phenotyped under greenhouse conditions (pathogenicity tests) followed by screening available SNP markers across the entire set of RIL populations.
Varieties