Greenhouse experiment to assess the response to R. leguminosarum of 36 lentil accessions.

Overview
2017

This project is being conducted in the agriculture greenhouses with the 7 Lens species and the commercial strain of R. leguminosarum BASF 4035.

Research Area
Physiology

The objectives of the Pulse Research Group Physiology Program is to investigate whole plant and field responses of crops, particularly pulse crops, to nutrient, water and weather.  To understand and improve yield formation in pulse crops in a warming climate.  To investigate and improve nitrogen ... [more]

 
Related Species

Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an important pulse crop with annual production of 3-4 Mt across 70 countries (Cubero et al. 2009. DOI 10.1079/9781845934873.0000; pg. 13). Lentils are a good source of protein, carbohydrates, micronutrients and vitamins for human nutrition and is consumed in more than 120 countries. Furthermore, their small seed size and flat shape make them relatively quick cooking and easily decorticated compared to most other grain legumes (Sharpe et al. 2013. BMC Genomics. DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-14-192). The Lentil plant has a bushy growth habit with a height of about 40 cm; the seeds are lens-shaped and usually grow two per pod. ... [more]

 

Lens ervoides is a wild relative of Lens culinaris with semi-hastate or lanceolate stipules. L. ervoides can be distinguished from other wild Lentil species by its smaller leaves, calyx teath, pods and seeds1. L. ervoides is often found in shady or partially shady niches, such as among bushes or under trees, with stony soils1. Unlike other wild lentil species, L. ervoides is rarely found in mixed stands with other wild lentils1. Recent sequence analysis indicates that Lens ervoides is in the tertiary gene pool of L. culinaris2 ... [more]

 

Lens lamottei is a wild relative of Lens culinaris with horizontal, less dentate stipules1. Recent sequence analysis indicates that Lens lamottei is in the secondary gene pool of L. culinaris2. ... [more]

 

Lens nigricans is a wild relative of Lens culinaris. L. nigricans has stipules that are considerably semi-hastate and dentate at their base1. This species can be divided into two groups based on the orientation of their stipules. Those accessions with upright stipules are usually found in gravelly soil in southern Spain, southern Italy and along the Adriatic coast of Yugoslavia, as well as in man-made habitats throughout southern Europe; whereas, those accessions with horizontal stipules were found on calcereous or basaltic soil in stony and gravelly habitats in Israel and Turkey1. Recent sequence analysis indicates that Lens nigricans is in the quaternary gene pool of L. culinaris2 ... [more]

 

Lens odemensis is a wild relative of Lens culinaris with semi-hastate stipules which form horizontal positions on the stem1. Recent sequence analysis indicates that Lens odemensis is in the secondary gene pool of L. culinaris2. ... [more]

 

Lens orientalis is a wild relative of Lens culinaris with lanceolate stipules. The geographical distribution of Lens orientalis ranges from Turkey to Uzbekistan with a primary habitat of stony and gravelly niches where aggressive annuals are not successful1. Lens orientalis usually forms small disjunct populations containing a small number of plants in sparse stands1. More extensive populations of L. orientalis were found at high elevations (800 to 2,000 m)1. Recent sequence analysis indicates that Lens orientalis is in the primary gene pool of L. culinaris2 ... [more]

 

Lens tomentosus is a wild relative of Lens culinaris. Morphologically, L. tomentosus most resembles L. orientalis although it can be distinguished as having a hairy pod2. Recent sequence analysis indicates that Lens orientalis is in the primary gene pool of L. culinaris2. ... [more]

 
Sequences, Variants & Markers