Seed coat removal improves iron bioavailability in cooked lentils: studies using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model

Overview
TitleSeed coat removal improves iron bioavailability in cooked lentils: studies using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model
AuthorsDellaValle Diane M, Vandenberg Albert, Glahn Raymond P
TypeJournal Article
JournalJournal of agricultural and food chemistry
Volume61
Issue34
DOI10.1021/jf4022916
eISSN1520-5118
Elocation10.1021/jf4022916
ISSN1520-5118
Journal AbbreviationJ. Agric. Food Chem.
Journal CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Language Abbreng
Publication Date2013 Aug 28
Publication ModelPrint-Electronic

Abstract

<p>In this study we examined the range of Fe concentration and relative Fe bioavailability of 24 varieties of cooked lentils, as well as the impact of seed coat removal on Fe nutritional as well as antinutrient properties. Relative Fe bioavailability was assessed by the in vitro/Caco-2 cell culture method. While the Fe concentration of the whole lentil was moderately high (72.8 ± 10.8 μg/g, n = 24), the relative Fe bioavailability was moderate (2.4 ± 1.0 ng of ferritin/mg of protein). Although removing the seed coat reduced the Fe concentration by an average of 16.4 ± 9.4 μg/g, the bioavailability was significantly improved (+5.3 ± 2.2 ng of ferritin/mg of protein; p < 0.001), and the phytic acid concentration was reduced by 7% (p = 0.04). Like most legume seeds, the lentil seed coat contains a range of polyphenols known to inhibit Fe bioavailability. Thus, along with breeding for high Fe concentration and bioavailability (i.e., biofortification), seed coat removal appears to be a practical way to improve Fe bioavailability of the lentil.</p>

Citation

DellaValle DM, Vandenberg A, Glahn RP. Seed coat removal improves iron bioavailability in cooked lentils: studies using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model. Journal of agricultural and food chemistry. 2013 Aug 28; 61(34):8084-9.

Related Species
Related Species: 

Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an important pulse crop with annual production of 3-4 Mt across 70 countries (Cubero et al. 2009. DOI 10.1079/9781845934873.0000; pg. 13). Lentils are a good source of protein, carbohydrates, micronutrients and vitamins for human nutrition and is consumed in more than 120 countries. Furthermore, their small seed size and flat shape make them relatively quick cooking and easily decorticated compared to most other grain legumes (Sharpe et al. 2013. BMC Genomics. DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-14-192). The Lentil plant has a bushy growth habit with a height of about 40 cm; the seeds are lens-shaped and usually grow two per pod. ... [more]

 
Cross References
This publication is also available in the following databases:
DatabaseAccession
PMID: PubMedPMID:23915260
Research Area
Research Area: 
Physiology

The objectives of the Pulse Research Group Physiology Program is to investigate whole plant and field responses of crops, particularly pulse crops, to nutrient, water and weather.  To understand and improve yield formation in pulse crops in a warming climate.  To investigate and improve nitrogen ... [more]