Effect of genotype and environment on the concentrations of starch and protein in, and the physicochemical properties of starch from, field pea and fababean

Overview
TitleEffect of genotype and environment on the concentrations of starch and protein in, and the physicochemical properties of starch from, field pea and fababean
AuthorsHood-Niefer Shannon D, Warkentin Thomas D, Chibbar Ravindra N, Vandenberg Albert, Tyler Robert T
TypeJournal Article
JournalJournal of the science of food and agriculture
Volume92
Issue1
CopyrightCopyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.
DOI10.1002/jsfa.4552
eISSN1097-0010
Elocation10.1002/jsfa.4552
ISSN1097-0010
Journal AbbreviationJ. Sci. Food Agric.
Journal CountryEngland
LanguageEnglish
Language Abbreng
Publication Date2012 Jan 15
Publication ModelPrint-Electronic

Abstract

<p><b>BACKGROUND</b></br>The effects of genotype and environment and their interaction on the concentrations of starch and protein in, and the amylose content and thermal and pasting properties of starch from, pea and fababean are not well known.</p><p><b>RESULTS</b></br>Differences due to genotype were observed in the concentrations of starch and protein in pea and fababean, in the onset temperature (To) and peak temperature (Tp) of gelatinization of fababean starch, and in the pasting, trough, cooling and final viscosities of pea starch and fababean starch. Significant two-way interactions (location × genotype) were observed for the concentration of starch in fababean and the amylose content, To, endothermic enthalpy of gelatinization (ΔH) and trough viscosity of fababean starch. Significant three-way interactions (location × year × genotype) were observed for the concentration of starch in pea and the pasting, trough, cooling and final viscosities of pea starch.</p><p><b>CONCLUSION</b></br>Differences observed in the concentrations of starch and protein in pea and fababean were sufficient to be of practical significance to end-users, but the relatively small differences in amylose content and physicochemical properties of starch from pea and fababean were not.</p>

Citation

Hood-Niefer SD, Warkentin TD, Chibbar RN, Vandenberg A, Tyler RT. Effect of genotype and environment on the concentrations of starch and protein in, and the physicochemical properties of starch from, field pea and fababean. Journal of the science of food and agriculture. 2012 Jan 15; 92(1):141-50.

Related Species
Related Species: 

Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is one of the first domesticated crops, and was the model crop for the foundational genetic studies by Gregor Mendel, which he first reported in 1865. Pea is grown in most temperate regions of the world with annual production over the past decade of 10-12 million tonnes of field pea and 14-17 million tonnes of vegetable pea. Pea belongs to the Leguminosae family and consists of two species, P. fulvum and P. sativum with several ‘wild’ subspecies of P. sativum. Canada is the leading producer and exporter of field pea in the world. Saskatchewan is the leading province in pea production followed by Alberta and Manitoba. ... [more]

 

Faba bean is an annual legume that thrives in relatively cooler growing climates. It is one of the best nitrogen fixers among the grain legumes deriving up to 74% of its nitrogen from the atmosphere and leaving soil nitrogen balances positive (Amanuel et al., Biol Fertil Soils 32:353–359). Nutritionally, it is a good source of dietary fiber, protein, phosphorus, copper and manganese, and a very good source of folate. It is also very low in saturated fat, cholesterol and sodium. Faba bean has an erect growth habit with stiff stems and long pinnate, gray-green leaves. The pods are long with a downy interior and contain 3-8 seeds. Faba bean is still often grown as a cover crop to prevent erosion, because they can overwinter and because as a legume, they fix nitrogen in the soil. ... [more]

 
Cross References
This publication is also available in the following databases:
DatabaseAccession
PMID: PubMedPMID:21780131
Research Area
Research Area: 
Physiology

The objectives of the Pulse Research Group Physiology Program is to investigate whole plant and field responses of crops, particularly pulse crops, to nutrient, water and weather.  To understand and improve yield formation in pulse crops in a warming climate.  To investigate and improve nitrogen ... [more]