Projects

2017
This population between Eston (L. culinaris) and IG 72623 (L. odemensis) is being evaluated to investigate the genetic and phenotypic variability for agronomic and growth habit and to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the quantitative variation for these traits in wild and cultivated lentils.
2014 to 2017
This is an international project funded by the Global Crop Diversity Trust aimed at evaluating cultivated x wild lentil introgression lines for multiple traits in multiple environments.
2013 to 2016
As production of the dry bean is moving towards short season growing regions such as Alberta and Saskatchewan, it is becoming increasingly important to find a way to develop abiotic stress tolerances for the dry bean. Through the incorporation of genes from other species, the stress tolerance capabilities of the dry bean will increase, making it less sensitive to its surrounding climate. The tepary bean was decided upon as the best genetic donor for improvement to the dry bean, and is now being evaluated in Saskatchewan and its international partners.
2013 to 2016
Our approach to sequencing the lentil genome is two-fold. First, we are generating a high quality draft genome for a single lentil genotype (CDC Redberry), including bulk sequencing, assembly of chromosomal ‘pseudomolecules’, and gene prediction and annotation. Secondly, we are re-sequencing various lentil accessions from around the globe to reveal the breath of genetic potential present in our germplasm resources. The outcome will give us i) an understanding of how modern breeding has re-shaped the lentil genome, ii) identification of genes and genomic interval that control agronomic traits, and iii) discovery of many genetic polymorphisms for future marker development, that together will add considerable resources to the breeder’s toolbox for lentil genetic improvement. More importantly, the results of this project will allow us to leverage knowledge of important trait based on conservation of genome-based features with other legume crops (such as Medicago and chickpea).
2013 to 2016
Lentils are seen as a source for essential vitamins and minerals for human nutrition, but due to the high anti-nutritional factors of raffinose family oligosaccharides the consumption of lentils are being limited. Other methods to lower the levels of these RFOs are costly, and that is why an alternative strategy to develop varieties of lentil with lower levels is being implemented.
2016
Lentil recombinant inbred lines (LR-86) derived from a cross between Lupa # 7 (L. culinaris) x BGE016880 (L. orientalis) were evaluated in five replications in 2016 in the field at the Crop Science Field Lab of the University of Saskatchewan. Days to flowering, days to maturity, plant height at maturity, shattering percentage, number of seeds per plant, and seed yield per plant were recorded. The population was genotyped and mapped using a genotyping-by-sequencing approach. Major QTLs for shattering resistance were identified on LGs 4 and 7. In 2017, the population was grown in two locations (Investigation field and Sutherland) in three replications to confirm the identified QTL for shattering resistance.
2012 to 2015
This group is involved in a wide range of biotechnology projects that accelerate the legume breeding process. Double-haploid technology has been achieved in both chickpea and field pea by the CDC group in collaboration with colleagues in France and Australia. Efforts are underway to adapt this technology to lentil. Improving efficiency and integrating these techniques into routine breeding programs to enhance genetic gain are important long-term goals.
2013 to 2015
The objectives of this study are to determine the effect of genotype and environment on iron bioavailability in a set of five pea varieties differing in phytate concentration using the Caco-2 mammalian cell bioassay, to determine whether iron bioavailability in field pea is heritable by evaluating recombinant inbred lines differing in phytate concentration using the Caco-2 mammalian cell bioassay, and to determine the effect of the pea low phytate trait on chicken performance and iron bioavailability in chicken.
2014
A number of KASP markers were developed based on the genotypes identified under the Lentil 454 Sequencing Project. An initial set were used for validation of the SNP calling before developing the Illumina Golden Gate Assay (Lc1536). An additional 350 KASP primers were then designed for the SNPs that were successfully mapped using data from the GoldenGate array (see Fedoruk et al. 2013).
2014
This Phaseolus vulgaris assembly for the Andean line G19833 was made available by Phytozome as a PRE-RELEASE and has been deprecated in favour of the newest published. This pre-release assembly was used in our Common Bean 454 SNP Discovery Project to anchor the reads for SNP calling and is made available here simply to provide context for that analysis. The main assembly was generated using Newbler version 2.5.3. This is an improved preliminary release of Phaseolus vulgaris that uses all of the ARRA generated data (DOE-JGI, ARRA, and USDA-ARS funding).

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